The Best Odds You’ll Get All Day: 3 to 1 Chance A Horse Will Die Before Nightfall

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UPDATE: A horse died during the running of the Melbourne Cup – see details below.

If you’re looking for good odds on the Melbourne Cup racing carnival today, then find yourself a bookie who’s prepared to lay out some cash on the odds a racehorse will die some time today, during the Melbourne Cup carnival.

According to website horseracingkills.com a racehorse dies on an Australian track, on average, every three days.

From August 1 last year (the ‘Horses Birthday’) until July 31st this year, 119 horses died on tracks around the country. NSW led the slaughter, with 52, followed by Queensland and Victoria, both with 24.

That equates to around a 33 percent chance of it occurring today, which should roughly translate to odds with a bookie of around 2-1.

In terms of the Melbourne Cup carnival itself, the 2014 carnival bucked the national trend with a higher than average death rate – two horses were killed, Admire Rakti (died in his stall after the race), and Araldo, who broke his right hind leg and had to be euthanased.

In 2015, Red Cadeaux also shattered her leg during the race and was also later put down.

And that’s just the statistics horses who ‘make it’. The ones who don’t – about 40 per cent of Australia’s racing stock – are sent to the abattoir. We use them primarily for fertiliser and dog food.

If you’re after a really safe bet, you might convince a bookie to stump up some cash that pays out if the horse you back in the Melbourne Cup gets whipped.

The odds on that occurring are basically 100 per cent, so you’ll probably only get even money.

Happy Punting.

UPDATE: If you found a bookie to back the 3 to 1 chance a racehorse would die in the Melbourne Cup Carnival, then you would have doubled your money. A short time ago, the RSPCA confirmed the death of the sixth horse in the last five years of the carnival.

And here’s a tweet with an image of the horse injured on the ground, covered by a large barrier… so that none of us actually have to see what it is we endorse.

Chris Graham

Chris Graham is the publisher and editor of New Matilda. He is the former founding managing editor of the National Indigenous Times and Tracker magazine. Chris has won a Walkley Award, a Walkley High Commendation and two Human Rights Awards for his reporting. He lives in Brisbane and splits his time between Stradbroke Island, where New Matilda is based, and the mainland.

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